Before They Pass Away – Part 2

This is the second part of a post about Jimmy Nelson’s anthropological photographic project Before They Pass Away. For those who missed it, here is a recap of the project:

‘’In 2009, I planned to become a guest of 31 secluded and visually unique tribes. I wanted to witness their time-honoured traditions, join in their rituals and discover how the rest of the world is threatening to change their way of life forever. Most importantly, I wanted to create an ambitious aesthetic photographic document that would stand the test of time. A body of work that would be an irreplaceable ethnographic record of a fast disappearing world.”

Here is my selection of favourites from the next ten tribes…

Tsaatan (reindeer people) are the last reindeer herders who survived for thousands of years inhabiting the remotest subartic taiga, moving between 5 and 10 times a year. Presently, only 44 families remain, their existence threatened by the dwindling number of their domesticated reindeer.”

TSA-12

“The Samburu people live in northern Kenya, where the foothills of Mount Kenya merge into the northern dessert. As cattle-herding Nilotes, they reached Kenya some five hundred years ago, moving southwards along the plains of the Rift Valley in a rapid, all-conquering advance.”

samburu-7

“For almost 1,000 years, the Rabari have roamed the deserts and plains of what is today western India. It is believed that this tribe, with a peculiar Persian physiognomy, migrated from the Iranian plateau more than a millennium ago. The Rabari are now found largely in Gujarat and Rajasthan. “

rabari-7-new

“The nomadic Mursi tribe lives in the lower area of Africa’s Great Rift Valley…The Mursi are famous for their stick-fighting ceremony and Mursi women are known all over the world for wearing clay plates in their lower lips”

omo-15

“Ladakh (meaning ‘land of the passes’) is a cold desert in the Northern Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir. It is divided into the mainly Muslim Kargil district and the primarily Buddhist Leh district. The people of Ladakh have a rich folklore, some of which date back to the pre-Buddhist era.”

NELS120790-TRIBES-LADAKHI-017

“Settlement in the 85 Vanuatu islands dates back to around 500 BC. There is evidence that Melanesian navigators from Papua New Guinea were the first to colonise Vanuatu. Over centuries, other migrations followed. Nowadays, all the inhabited islands have their own languages, customs and traditions.”

van-2b

“The approximately 5.5 million Tibetans are an ethnic group with bold and uninhibited characteristics. Archaeological and geological discoveries indicate that the Tibetans are descendants of aboriginal and nomadic Qiang tribes.”

Nepal_Portraits_1_6

“For at least a thousand years, the Amazonian rainforest of Ecuador, the Oriente, has been home to the Huaorani (meaning ‘human beings’ or ‘the people’). They consider themselves to be the bravest tribe in the Amazon. Until 1956, they had never had any contact with the outside world.”

Hua-3-

“Around 2,500 Drokpas live in three small villages in a disputed territory between India and Pakistan…For centuries, the Drokpas have been indulging in public kissing and wife-swapping without inhibitions. Their cultural exuberance is reflected in exquisite dresses and ornaments. “

NELS120785-TRIBES-DROPKA-011

“The 20,000-strong Dassanech (meaning ‘People from the Delta”) inhabit the southernmost region of the Great Rift Valley, where the Omo River Delta enters Lake Turkana.”

omo-45

 

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One Response to Before They Pass Away – Part 2

  1. This is the most wonderful series of posts, I couldn’t wait to check the website and will order the book ASAP. Such beautiful and inspiring images. Seeing these really brings back that we are connected with a much bigger world. Thank you!

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